Top Ten Books I Wish Santa Would Bring Me

December 19, 2016 Top Ten Tuesday 2

TTT

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted over at the other blog I write for, The Broke and the Bookish.

I can’t believe Christmas is this Sunday! This entire holiday season has flown by, and I’m sad it’s almost over. I don’t know about you, but the anticipation and the build-up is more fun for me than the actual Christmas Day. Today we’re showing off our letters to Santa, and of course I had a hard time deciding on which books I’d love to get this year! Some of them haven’t been released yet, but Santa is magical and I know he can pull this kind of thing off!

1. The Hating Game by Sally Thorne
2. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
3. Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick
4. One Dance with a Duke by Tessa Dare
5. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier
6. A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas
7. Song of the Current by Sarah Tolcser
8. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton
9. The Crown’s Fate by Evelyn Skye
10. Riders by Veronica Rossi

What books do you hope to find under the tree this Christmas?

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Cooke’s Twelfth Night | Saving Hamlet Christmas Bonus by Molly Booth

December 19, 2016 Guest Post 0

A big Christmassy welcome to Molly Booth, 2016 debut author of Saving Hamlet! I was so excited when Molly told me her idea for A Bookish Little Christmas because I LOVE time travel and I really loved this idea of having Cooke (a guy from Elizabethan England) write a letter to Emma (our modern-day main character) during Christmastime in his time. Seriously, how fun is this?


Cooke’s Twelfth Night
by Molly Booth

It is London, late 1601. Alexander Cooke, actor at the Globe Playhouse, prepares to play a new role with Shakespeare and the Chamberlain’s Men. He sorely misses his futuristic friend, Emma Allen. Unsure how to feel better, he fitfully writes her a letter.

My Dearest, Em

Emma, Emma, wherefore art thou, Emma? Deny thy time and refuse thy name. Though in sooth, I love thy real name, even if it doth keep us parted. My friend, much time hath passed since I last saw thee. The sun riseth, and I miss thee. It seteth, and I miss thee more. I write this letter to ease my aching mind — my heart, I fear, groweth so weary and cold there is naught to do for comfort.

I fear, also, that I am growing too dramatic.

Our company hath abandoned our Globe for the season, and we play indoors, lit by candle light. Master Shakespeare hath written a new play, “What You Will,” and I know thou wouldst like it. ’Tis a comedy, but if it twere a stream, the river bed would be of tragedy. We rehearse madly, for in a fortnight, we play for Queen Elizabeth and the Italian Duke Orsini. Art thou impressed?

I play a young woman, Viola, grieving for the loss of her twin brother. She disguiseth herself as a young lord to work for the Duke Orsino (Master Shakespeare flatters our Italian visitor with great subtlety). Naturally, Viola falleth in love with Orsino, and once again, the play ends with my marriage to Burbage.

I remember thee, when I am Viola. I remember thy spirit, thy clumsy, gentle ways. I remember thy grief after Master Wick’s passing. I feel the grief that bears down in my breast when I think of how we are parted. It feels wrong, though I know a shift in time cannot be right?

How shall I send this letter? Down a trap door? Up through heaven? By thunderstorm? By cannon?

Like all of Master Shakespeare’s plays, there is truth and beauty in this new one that bring tears and comfort:

O time, thou must untangle this, not I. It is too hard a knot for me to un’tie.

O — thou must knowest this play, as thou knowest all secrets of our future. So, couldst thou send us the final title? Master Shakespeare hath just discovered that another playwright hath new a play also called “What You Will.” He is not pleased.

I prithee. Do not stay away so long.

Cooke

Copyright © Molly Booth 2016


Saving Hamlet by Molly Booth
November 1, 2016 from Disney-Hyperion
Add to Goodreads | Amazon

I wanted sophomore year to be different, but this was a little much.

Emma Allen couldn’t be more excited to start her sophomore year. Not only is she the assistant stage manager for the drama club’s production of Hamlet, but her crush Brandon is directing, and she’s rocking a new haircut that’s sure to get his attention. But soon after school starts, everything goes haywire. Emma’s suddenly promoted to stage manager, her best friend, Lulu, stops talking to her, and Josh—the sweet soccer player who’s been cast as the lead—turns out to be a disaster. It’s up to Emma to fix it all, but she has no clue where to start.

One night after rehearsal, Emma stays behind to think through her life’s latest crises and distractedly falls through the stage’s trap door…landing in the basement of the Globe Theater.

It’s London, 1601, and with her awesome new pixie cut, everyone thinks Emma’s a boy—even Will Shakespeare himself. Dropped into the middle of the original production of Hamlet, Emma gamely plays her role as backstage assistant, jumping at the chance to experience theatre history and rub shoulders with legends. But the Globe’s Hamlet has its own problems, and once Emma starts traveling back and forth through time, things get really confusing. In which reality does she belong? And can she possibly save two epically tragic productions of Hamlet before time runs out?


About Molly Booth

Molly Booth grew up homeschooled in Massachusetts with her four boisterous siblings. She stage managed for three different community theatres in high school. Her first college was Bunker Hill Community College in Charlestown, MA; she then went on to study writing, literature, and Elizabethan history on a very cold hill at Marlboro College in Vermont. There, she wrote the first drafts of Saving Hamlet, her debut novel, coming 11/1/16 from Disney Hyperion. Her second book, Nothing Happened, will be coming spring 2018.

Molly also writes for The Mary Sue, and sometimes other sites like HelloGiggles, The Tempest, and McSweeney’s.  She spends most of her time snuggling her adorable dog Suzie, pet rats Meg and Marigold, and Harriet the queen cat.

Website | Twitter | Facebook

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

The Debut Dish: December 2016, Issue #2 (+ Giveaways)

December 18, 2016 Author Interview, Debut Author Challenge, Debut Dish, Giveaway 6

The Debut Dish, a bi-monthly Debut Author Challenge feature, is where you go for the scoop on some pretty awesome debut authors and their new books! Hopefully these interviews will inspire you to add many, many more books to your to-read list. Because, really, who doesn’t need more books in their lives?

This is the final Debut Dish issue of the 2016 Debut Author Challenge! I can’t believe it!

Sign up for the 2017 Debut Author Challenge!

This issue of The Debut Dish features Audrey Coulthurst (Of Fire and Stars), Molly Booth (Saving Hamlet), and Erica M. Chapman (Teach Me to Forget).


Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurts
November 22, 2016 from Balzer + Bray
Add to Goodreads | Author Website

Betrothed since childhood to the prince of Mynaria, Princess Dennaleia has always known what her future holds. Her marriage will seal the alliance between Mynaria and her homeland, protecting her people from other hostile lands. But Denna has a secret. She possesses an Affinity for fire—a dangerous gift for the future queen of a kingdom where magic is forbidden.

Now, Denna must learn the ways of her new home while trying to hide her growing magic. To make matters worse, she must learn to ride Mynaria’s formidable warhorses—and her teacher is the person who intimidates her most, the prickly and unconventional Princess Amaranthine—called Mare—the sister of her betrothed.

When a shocking assassination leaves the kingdom reeling, Mare and Denna reluctantly join forces to search for the culprit. As the two become closer, Mare is surprised by Denna’s intelligence and bravery, while Denna is drawn to Mare’s independent streak. And soon their friendship is threatening to blossom into something more.

But with dangerous conflict brewing that makes the alliance more important than ever, acting on their feelings could be deadly. Forced to choose between their duty and their hearts, Mare and Denna must find a way to save their kingdoms—and each other.

Describe your book in five words or less.
Magic, assassinations, and lesbian princesses.

Tell us about your favorite scene in your book.
One of the scenes I had the most fun writing was Princess Dennaleia’s first horseback riding lesson. She wants to make a good impression, but she’s nervous and Princess Amaranthine (Mare) is not thrilled to be teaching her. Dennaleia also hasn’t quite figured out why she gets even more anxious every time Mare touches her.

Where were you when you found out you were being published?
I was at my day job and I couldn’t find a free room to take the call, so I was running around through the halls all panicked. I ended up in a reception area staring out at the Pacific Ocean.

What’s your favorite junk food?
I have a real weakness for ice cream, especially if it involves an alarming amount of chocolate. In weirder things, one of my critique partners got me addicted to Dutch licorice, which can only be described as vaguely reminiscent of roadkill or cat litter and yet is still somehow delicious.

What’s the oddest thing on your desk right now?
A paperweight made out of the leaping cat hood ornament from a 1959 Mark IX Jaguar. My mom drove it through the side of a building when she was in college and apparently it was the only part of the front end of the car that survived.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Saving Hamlet by Molly Booth
November 1, 2016 from Disney-Hyperion
Add to Goodreads | Author Website

I wanted sophomore year to be different, but this was a little much.

Emma Allen couldn’t be more excited to start her sophomore year. Not only is she the assistant stage manager for the drama club’s production of Hamlet, but her crush Brandon is directing, and she’s rocking a new haircut that’s sure to get his attention. But soon after school starts, everything goes haywire. Emma’s suddenly promoted to stage manager, her best friend, Lulu, stops talking to her, and Josh—the sweet soccer player who’s been cast as the lead—turns out to be a disaster. It’s up to Emma to fix it all, but she has no clue where to start.

One night after rehearsal, Emma stays behind to think through her life’s latest crises and distractedly falls through the stage’s trap door…landing in the basement of the Globe Theater.

It’s London, 1601, and with her awesome new pixie cut, everyone thinks Emma’s a boy—even Will Shakespeare himself. Dropped into the middle of the original production of Hamlet, Emma gamely plays her role as backstage assistant, jumping at the chance to experience theatre history and rub shoulders with legends. But the Globe’s Hamlet has its own problems, and once Emma starts traveling back and forth through time, things get really confusing. In which reality does she belong? And can she possibly save two epically tragic productions of Hamlet before time runs out?

Describe your book in five words or less.
Time traveling Shakespeare drama teens!

Tell us about your favorite scene in your book.
My favorite scene in the book is where the main character, Emma Allen, goes out to an Elizabethan-style cast party, in 1601, with Shakespeare’s theatre company. It’s an eye-opening evening for her, and it was a total blast to write.

Where were you when you found out you were being published?
I was in Vermont, visiting my alma mater, Marlboro College! Specifically, I was sitting in a best friend’s car, overlooking gorgeous Vermont mountains. I had to tell my literary agent to put the phone down, so I could scream xD.

What’s your favorite junk food?
Potato chips. Forever and ever potato chips.

What’s the oddest thing on your desk right now?
A purple, glittery skull.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Teach Me to Forget by Erica M. Chapman
December 2, 2016 from Merit Press
Add to Goodreads | Author Website

This is the story of Ellery, a girl who learns how to live while waiting for the date she chose to die.

Ellery’s bought the gun, made arrangements for her funeral, and even picked the day. A Wednesday. Everything has fallen into place.

Now all she has to do is die.

When her plans go awry and the gun she was going to kill herself with breaks, she does the one thing she has control over–return it and get a new one. After tormenting the crusty customer service associate by trying to return the gun with the wrong receipt, Ellery gets caught by the security guard who also happens to be someone she knows–the annoyingly perfect Colter Sawyer from her English class.

Colter quickly uncovers what she’s hiding and is determined to change her mind. After confessing a closely held secret of his own, he promises not to tell hers. Ellery tries to fight her attraction to him as the shadows of her past cling tight around her, but when she’s faced with another tragedy, she must decide whether she can learn to live with what she’s done or follow through with her plan to die.

Describe your book in five words or less.
Guilt-ridden Ellery wants to die.

Tell us about your favorite scene in your book.
Oh boy. Let’s see… My favorite scene is toward the end of the book. I call it “The Bridge Scene”. Without giving too much away, it’s where everything in the story reaches the breaking point. I cried so much writing this story but that scene in particular really got me. It’s emotional, desperate, and it’s where the reader finds out a lot about who the protagonist, Ellery really is.

Where were you when you found out you were being published?
Actually I was at work. I missed the call! I can’t remember exactly what I said to my co-workers but I know they heard my gasp and shock ;o) I wish it was more interesting than that. Like I was sky-diving and checked my phone and saw the message. Or maybe that I was on a plane and the choir traveling to a competition serenaded me with “Celebration” by Kool in the Gang.

What’s your favorite junk food?
Okay. I’m in love with the Hickory BBQ Wavy Lays and Peanut Butter M&Ms, oh and Taffy. I love Taffy. Wait, was I only supposed to give one.

What’s the oddest thing on your desk right now?
I’m obsessed with ampersands. I’ve got a tattoo of one, I buy anything ampersand so I have a lot of them on my desk and around my place. The oddest thing on my desk is probably the ampersand that I stole (legally, no worries) from a NY & Co. store that left the mall I worked for. It follows me to every job.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

One Snowy Night by Jill Shalvis | Book Review

December 17, 2016 Adult Fiction, Book Review 0 ★★★

One Snowy Night by Jill Shalvis | Book ReviewOne Snowy Night by Jill Shalvis
Series: Heartbreaker Bay #2.5
Published by Avon Impulse on November 8, 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Holiday, Romance
Pages: 160
Format: eARC
Source: From the publisher through Edelweiss
Amazon Add to Goodreads
3 Stars
It’s Christmas Eve and Rory Andrews is desperate to get home to the family she hasn’t seen in years. Problem is, her only ride to Lake Tahoe comes in the form of the annoyingly handsome Max Stranton, and his big, goofy, lovable dog Carl.

Hours stuck in a truck with the dead sexy Max sounds like a fate worse than death (not), but Rory’s out of options. She’s had a crush on Max since high school and she knows he’s attracted to her, too. But they have history… and Max is the only one who knows why it went south.

They’ve done a good job of ignoring their chemistry so far, but a long road trip in a massive blizzard might be just what they need to face their past… and one steamy, snowy night is all it takes to bring Max and Rory together at last.

I love those romances where the love interests knew each other as kids (and usually hated each other) and then are brought back together by the craziness of life. I also love it when blizzards act as matchmakers and force people to develop deep bonds. And I love animals that seem to thrive when people fall in love around them. This is One Snowy Night in a nutshell, and I really enjoyed it! I was expecting it to be longer, though. The book file told me I had about 40% of the book left and BAM, it ended and gave us previews of other books by Jill (so no, this novella was not 160 pages and if I had bought it I would have felt seriously cheated). I was looking forward to more details and romance… I did feel like things were resolved super quickly, but I had so much fun with the romance and the festiveness and the small story that I did get. I liked Rory and Max individually and together, and I liked their heavier back stories and those resolutions (although Max’s grudge against Rory was silly and unfounded, so he did bug me some…). Was the romance a little fast-moving to feel realistic? Yes. But I tend to be lenient with Christmas romances so it’s ok.

This novella was my first taste of the Heartbreaker Bay series and my second Jill Shalvis book, the first of which was also a Christmas novella. I’ve decided that I like Jill and her characters, but I think I need to read her full length novels. I think they are probably stronger and more developed.

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Frost Christmas Prequel by Kate Avery Ellison

December 16, 2016 Uncategorized 0

Guys, this is such an exciting day for me!!! Kate Avery Ellison, one of my favorite authors (she wrote the The Frost Chronicles and The Secrets of Itlantis) is here with an exclusive Christmas story prequel to Frost! Look at how beautiful her writing is and how awesome this world is.

I hope this story makes you flock to purchase all her books because I just LOVE them! And… another super exciting bit of news… she told me she enjoyed writing this story so much that she might write an anthology of holiday shorts for this Christmas. Just take my money already!


The Darkest Day in the Frost
by Kate Avery Ellison

Cold wind swirled around me as I ran down the path that led through the Frost’s deep and silent woods with a week’s worth of quota yarn in the bundle slung over my back. My breath came in quick, burning gasps, and the stitch in my side ached. My feet found the path even though it was covered in new snow, leaving a lonely tread of footprints in the snow behind me, a trail of crumbs to follow home. But though I knew the way, my heart drummed hard beneath the clasp of my cloak.

It had stormed the night before, and Frost was wrapped in a cloudy mist of snow and ice. The whole world seemed to be holding its breath in the wet, muffled silence made by the fresh snow. The misty white seemed to make everything larger and more ominous. I could see no more than three feet before me, even with the milky sunlight that lit the world from above.

Around me, branches laden with ice appeared as if blinking into existence from the mist that enveloped them. Spots of blue glowed here and there where the Frost’s peculiar snow blossoms, flowers that grew and flowered despite the freezing cold, bloomed just beneath their fresh covering of snow. The trees stood sentinel, piles of ice coating their bases, making them look like hooded figures to my anxious eyes. Somewhere in the deepest reaches of the forest, the monstrous creatures we called Watchers were waiting. I imagined them rising from the fog at every turn, and my skin prickled with every crack of a branch and shower of snow from overladen trees.

Every day in the Frost was a struggle to survive, but today I felt particularly hopeless. My siblings and I were three orphans trying to run our farm and maintain our weekly required quota of yarn that we delivered to the village in exchange for food and supplies to keep us alive. Our little family—what was left of it—barely scraped by as it was. We had barely enough flour left in the kitchen for another day, because my young sister was growing like a sapling in spring and there was never enough to feed her. But I dared not let the village elders know, or they might take Ivy away to stay with another family. Now, the storm last night had knocked a tree onto the fence at the back of the barn.

We were lucky it hadn’t hit the barn itself, I supposed. Or the house. Still, I didn’t know how I was going to fix it.

Finally, I reached the hill above the village. The mist had burned away here, and I felt like a swimmer breaking the surface of an icy lake. I leaned against a tree to gather a lungful of air before I continued on. Hopeless or not, I would keep going. What else was there to do?

Crusty snow crunched beneath my feet as I entered Iceliss. Frost patterns clouded the windows of the shops, and snow piled high at the edges of the streets and along the ridges of the roofs. Voices and footsteps echoed weirdly. A strange energy hung in the air.

I scanned the crowds for any sign of my best friend, Ann, and her bright red hood that made her stand out from the rest of the pale-cloaked villagers like a robin amid swirling snowflakes.

What I saw instead made me stop in the street so suddenly that a miller with his load of flour collided with me. He muttered an apology, followed by a scant “Much light to ya, Weaver,” which I barely heard.

Garlands of snow blossoms were strung across every doorway and window. Quilted squares decorated with the flower were draped across the curtains along with streamers of blue, silver, and white ribbons. Bouquets of candles huddled in every window, ready to be lit as soon as the light faded. The streets were strung with lanterns, also ready to be lit as soon as the command was given. Every lantern was painted with pictures of snow blossoms and decorated with ribbons that dangled down into the streets. The villagers crossed beneath them, backs bowed beneath their loads, most impervious to the beauty that hung above them. A few children stopped and stared upward, their eyelashes and open mouths catching snowflakes that drifted from the cloudy sky.

Today was the Darkest Day, the shortest day of the entire year and the end of our calendar. Tonight, we would bundle ourselves in our houses with extra snow blossoms and as many candles and lanterns as we could light to ward off the dark, because with the dark came the monsters. The snow blossoms were strung and sprinkled everywhere, because for reasons unknown to us, they repelled the creatures that prowled our frozen forests at night. We would crowd around our fires with food and drink, tell stories into the wee hours of the morning, and exchange gifts at midnight. Hope was like a candle, and we would burn it in anticipation that the new year would be brighter than the last.

How could I have forgotten?

Truly, the date had fled my mind. My parents’ deaths six months ago had meant that all the work of the farm—all the responsibilities—fell upon me with the weight of too much snow upon a straggling pine.

I had no special foods to bring home, no gifts for my siblings. My sister especially loved the Darkest Day celebrations, and with our parents gone, she would be even more desperate to make the night as bright as possible.

I tried to think as I waited in the quota line with my yarn. I had a few extra skeins in my pocket that I’d brought to trade for turnips to feed the livestock. Could I spare them to buy a few sweets instead?

After I’d turned in my quota, I headed for the market. It was crowded with jostling villagers. Extra stalls were selling candles and lanterns. I pushed my way through the confusion to the baker’s stall, where Lori Baker was selling pies and small jars of fresh maple syrup to pour over snow. My heart twisted to see the jars, because my father had always bought each of us one as a treat. The memory flooded over me, threatening tears, but I didn’t cry. I couldn’t afford the luxury of tears, not anymore.

I locked gazes with Lori, who looked warm and well-fed. Beside her, I must look like a cold and feral cat. The winter had not been kind to what was left of my family.

She eyed me as if expecting me to grab one of the pies and run.

“Lia Weaver,” she acknowledged with a nod. “Much light to you.”

“Much light to you,” I said, and pulled the skeins from my pocket. “I need two jars of syrup.”

Lori shook her head. Her mouth curved with disdain. “Not for that.”

“This is two skeins of quality yarn!”

“My father told me to charge good prices,” she said. “Syrup is worth more than that paltry bit of thread.”

I forced back the angry retort that rose to my lips. “What can I buy with them, then?”

“We have no need of yarn,” she said. “My father wants meat and fish and beer, he told me. Furs, maybe, if it’s fox or rabbit. No yarn.”

Rabbit fur. I could check the traps I set in the Frost. Hope struggled in my chest. I pocketed the yarn and turned away without a word as the next person stepped forward to haggle.

I almost collided with Adam Brewer.
He caught me before I slammed into him, and his hands were warm against my arms. I wrenched away, my eyes wrenching away from his burning dark gaze. I was ashamed that he had witnessed my rejection at the hands of Lori Baker. Him, Adam Brewer, whom I did not trust.

“Much light to you,” I heard him say, but I was already hurrying away.
I needed to get back to the Frost while the light was still strong. If I found something in the traps, and skinned it…

“Lia!”

I turned, snapping out of my thoughts to see my best friend Ann rushing toward me. Her curly blonde hair blew into her eyes, and she brushed it away, smiling in a way she rarely did anymore. She caught my hand when she reached me, and she hugged me hard. She’d been holding on more tightly these days, as if she feared that each time we parted, it would be the last.

“I didn’t see you at the quota yard,” she said breathlessly. “I was looking everywhere.”

“I was at the market,” I said. “Looking for syrup for Ivy and Jonn.”

I didn’t tell her I’d forgotten the date, or that I hadn’t prepared. I didn’t tell her about Lori’s rudeness. Ann had enough of her own sorrows. I was just happy to see her smiling.

“Here,” she said, pressing the handle of a basket into my hand. “A present for Dark Day. No—don’t open it now.”

“Ann, I have nothing for you.” Again, I was dismayed at my failure.

“You have arms to embrace me,” she said, and so I hugged her fiercely. And somehow, that was enough.

~

I braved the fog of the forest, my pulse pounding and my ears straining for sounds of danger as I crept furtively through the milky white, feeling blind. Once, something crashed away from me noisily, and I froze in terror, but when all was quiet, I continued on and found deer tracks.

Not Watchers.

Nothing waited for me in the traps I’d set. One was broken, with small clawed feet leading away into the snow.

I turned a full circle in the snow, feeling empty as the traps had been. I could go back to the village and try to barter for something to give my siblings. Perhaps a few ribbons for Ivy, or a book for Jonn. But the sunlight was beginning to lessen. It was the shortest day of the year, after all. Not enough time to get to the village and back to the farm safely, not if I wanted to also feed the animals and do the rest of the chores.

With a sinking heart, I turned for home, forging through the misty white of the forest, brushing through the thorny branches of a bush.

I paused, and then knelt to brush away snow from the branches. The snow make a soft sound as it slid away from the bush, revealing a shock of bright red frostberries.

Ivy loved the bittersweet taste of them, I remembered, and I rarely had time to go looking for them. So I filled my pockets with as many as I could pick before my fingers began to go numb through my mittens, and then I turned for home, sweeping the forest with my gaze as I walked. This time, I wasn’t looking for signs of monsters, but for the treasures of the forest hidden beneath the snow.

I picked handfuls of snow blossoms and filled my empty quota bag with green branches from the forest pines. When I reached the farm, I could barely hold the weight of the bag and Ann’s basket. I dragged the things to the barn with me, fed the animals, and then approached the house. Darkness had already begun to tinge the sky blue. The air had taken on a bite that chilled me to my marrow. I paused at the door, below our wreath of dried snow blossoms, and knocked the snow from my boots before stepping inside.

“Jonn—”
I didn’t even have time to speak before my sister ambushed me. “You’re home,” she squealed. “Happy Dark Day, Lia!”

I set down the bag and Ann’s basket, aware of how misleading the pine branches must be. She probably thought I’d come loaded with presents. “Ivy,” I said. “I’m so sorry, but I didn’t remember—”

“Shhh.” She grabbed my hand. “Come to the fire. Your skin is like ice.”
She dragged me toward the chairs we kept close to the hearth and pushed me into the largest one. “Sit.”

“Where’s Jonn?” I asked, looking around the room. “Is he having an episode?”

Fear twisted me up at the thought. My twin brother had seizures in addition to lacking the ability to walk without assistance. He often had to lie down during the day with a cold washcloth over his eyes.

“Jonn,” Ivy called out, and then she jumped up and disappeared into my parents’ bedroom. When they reappeared, Jonn leaning heavily on Ivy’s shoulder, they were both smiling.

“Surprise!” Ivy shouted.
Jonn carried a bundle of cloth under one arm, and around his neck he’d draped strands of snow blossoms strung together with bits of yarn and ribbon. He sat down heavily in the chair beside mine and tossed the garlands into my lap.

“We made decorations,” Ivy announced, hovering at my side. “Just like Ma always did. Look, look. They’re a little sad-looking, because we didn’t have enough snow blossoms. But I think they are nice.”

My siblings’ garlands were sparse and clumsy compared to the ones my mother made, but they were absolutely beautiful to me. I touched a snow blossom petal with my fingertips as a mixture of emotions flooded me—sadness, followed by a sweet nostalgia.

“And this is for you,” Jonn added. He handed me the bundle. “We worked on it in secret this past month.”

“Open it!” Ivy said eagerly. Then, impatient, she leaned over me to do it herself. “It’s a new dress.”

“How in the world did you make this in a month?” I unfurled the dress, astonished and overwhelmed.

“Well, Ma was making it before…” Jonn didn’t finish that thought. “I found it in her things. Ivy and I finished it secretly.”

My eyes prickled, and my nose stung. I looked at them both, then the dress. I didn’t know what to say. Jonn, so strong despite his impairments. Ivy, the one I was always hounding to do her work.

“I love you both,” I whispered. “I’m so sorry I have brought nothing.”

Ivy leaped up and ran to where I’d left my things. She seemed infused with energy today. “You brought a basket. And a bag full of snow blossoms and pine branches. Look how big and beautiful these blossoms are! Were you in the deep Frost today?”

“I was checking the traps,” I admitted. “Hoping to find something to trade.”
Ivy picked up the basket from Ann. “What’s this?” she asked, and lifted the cover.

I stood and handed my new clothes and the garlands to Jonn. “Ann gave it to me.”

It was probably an embroidered pillow. Ann embroidered as her particular skill; everyone in Iceliss had a skill.

“It’s a feast,” Ivy said.

“What?”

I hurried to her side and looked over her shoulder into the basket. Nestled inside was a loaf of bread, two yams, a tiny pie, and a slab of cooked ham wrapped in parchment paper. A feast indeed. Ann must have smuggled this out of her father’s house. My heart swelled with gratitude for my dear friend.

“And I forgot—I brought frostberries,” I said. “I found them in the forest.”
Ivy hugged me tight.

“Let’s eat,” Jonn said. “And then we can decorate and tell riddles by the fire until the new year begins.”

~

Neither Ivy nor Jonn made it to midnight before falling asleep beside the fire, their stomachs full of Ann’s delicious food. We’d laughed and talked and told each other favorite memories of previous Dark Days, when Ma and Da were still with us. Ivy had cried a little too, which was not out of character for her. Jonn told us riddles. We’d eaten the berries with our fingers and licked the juice from the tips.

Now I sat alone, stoking the fire back to brilliance, listening for the sound of Watchers outside as I always did out of habit. The garlands hung over the windows, the fragrant pine branches adorned the mantel, and Ivy had sprinkled the rest of the snow blossoms around the front door in a heap of glistening blue. The air smelled like flowers and pine. The fire crackled, throwing bright light over the sleeping faces of my siblings.

All was quiet.

Then, something scraped against the side of the house.

I stiffened, straining to listen as my eyes flew to the window and the shutters that were bolted over the glass against the cold and the dark. The fire snapped and popped behind me, and the wind hummed a mournful note, and all else was silent. But I didn’t relax, I didn’t sit back. I waited, and held my breath, and terror drummed its cold fingers across my skin.

Was it a Watcher?

We were on the very edge of civilization. Our farm had its back to the cold, fathomless Frost. Sometimes we saw the massive tracks left by the monsters in the night, or heard their eerie screams.

I listened hard for anything—a growl, a hiss, a snarl—but the night outside was devoid of any sounds.

Finally, I slept.

~

Morning light woke me, streaming through the cracks in the shutters with blinding intensity. We’d slept late after our night of laughter and reminiscence. We’d all slept by the hearth on blankets, and I stretched my sore muscles as I sat up and brushed hair from my eyes. The garlands of snow blossoms were withered and strange in the light of day. The fire had died down to glowing coals.

It was a new year. The Darkest Day was behind us, and the monsters had not come.

I rose, washed myself with the icy water in my bedroom’s basin, and put on my new dress and old cloak. Chores still needed to be tended to, new year or not. I opened the door to step into the yard.

And stopped.

There, on the stoop amid the piles of snow blossoms, sat a pale blue lantern decorated with painted flowers and a festoon of ribbons. Next to it, nestled in the snow, were three jars.

I bent down and picked one up. I peered inside, and my heart stuttered a little at the sight of the frozen maple syrup inside.

There was no note, no name, but I had a suspicion of who had left the gifts. I didn’t know what to think of such a gesture, and so instead I turned and called to my brother and sister, waking them.

The chores could wait another half hour. The worries, the scraping to get by, the wondering about what the future held for us—all of it could wait for just a little while yet, because Jonn, Ivy, and I were going to make the traditional new year’s candy that we’d made every year with our Da—warm maple syrup poured over the fresh powdered snow.

When I stepped into the yard to find a snowbank suitable for the syrup candy, I spotted the fence that had been destroyed in the storm.

It was fixed.

We were not without friends, even though we didn’t always know who they might be. We could do this. We could struggle through together. Jonn, Ivy, and me.

And as I looked down at the jar of syrup in my hand, I felt hopeful.


Frost by Kate Avery Ellison
Self-published on March 28, 2012
Add to Goodreads | Amazon

In the icy, monster-plagued world of the Frost, compassion might get a person killed, and Lia Weaver knows this better than anyone. After the monsters kill her parents, she must keep the family farm running or risk losing her siblings to reassignment by the village Elders. With dangers on all sides, she can’t afford to let her emotions lead her astray. But when her sister finds a fugitive bleeding to death in the forest, a young man from beyond the Frost named Gabe, Lia does the unthinkable. She saves his life. Giving shelter to the fugitive could get her in trouble. The Elders have always described the advanced society of people beyond the Frost, the “Farthers,” as ruthless and cruel. Lia is startled to find that Gabe is empathetic and intelligent-and handsome. And she might even be falling for him. But time is running out. The monsters in the forest are growing bold and restless. The village leader is starting to ask questions. Farther soldiers are searching for Gabe. Is compassion-and love-worth the risk? Finally, when a startling discovery challenges everything she thought was true about her life, Lia realizes exactly what she must do.


About Kate Avery Ellison

I’ve been making up stories since I was five years old, and now I’m thrilled to be able to do it as a full-time job. I have an obsession with dark fantasy, dystopian futures, and Pride and Prejudice-style love stories full of witty banter and sizzling, unspoken feelings. When I’m not writing, I’m creating digital art, reading funny blogs, or watching my favorite shows (which include TVD and BSG). I live with my geeky husband and our two bad cats in Atlanta, GA.

Website | Twitter | Goodreads | Facebook | Amazon

 

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Mary E. Pearson’s Christmas Traditions | Author Guest Post

December 15, 2016 Guest Post 0

Mary E. Pearson is one of my very favorite authors (I LOVED The Kiss of Deception), so I was delighted when she accepted my request for a Christmas guest post this month!

This is not the first time Mary has guest posted on my blog. Did you see the post about the world of the Remnant Chronicles that she wrote for the Beauty of Darkness blog tour earlier this year? She posted some REALLY pretty pictures! Anyway, today we get to read about Mary’s Christmas traditions! She even included a really yummy sounding recipe. :)


Mary E. Pearson’s Christmas Traditions

“The tradition I had eschewed was now all that sustained me. I lifted my hands to the gods, but my songs flowed from that which was memorized to something new, utterances of another tongue . . . my voice rose, braided with the words of a thousand years . . . a prayer woven not of sounds alone, but of stars and dust and evermore.” –The Kiss of Deception

 

Tradition. The Christmas holiday is rich with it.

At the beginning of the Remnant Chronicles, Lia spurned tradition. I understand that. As we are growing into adulthood and making our own choices, we don’t want our decisions hampered by the expectation, “but this is how we have always done it.” Yes, we do need to sometimes break tradition! Finding new ways of doing things is what keeps our world vibrant and fresh and growing in positive ways. And yet . . .

There is a common history in tradition too, and the best of traditions can recall our past, help us to slow down and reflect even as we are bustling forward, and at no other time of the year, does tradition slow down the speeding train, help me reflect, and bring me more comfort than at Christmas. Sometimes those traditions can be something as simple as baking a cookie, hanging a particular ornament, looking at twinkling lights, singing a carol, watching a Christmas movie I’ve seen a hundred times, or hearing the jingle of a bell outside a store with a red bucket filling with donations, and the message, Peace on earth, goodwill toward men.

Yes, sometimes the memories are bittersweet too—I am reminded of a death, a lost relationship, or profound changes in the world just since the previous holiday, but the same tradition that can cause bittersweet pause can also help me take a breath, regroup, and gain strength for the challenges of a coming year. Making plans to move forward also requires grounding.

In The Kiss of Deception, when Lia was at her lowest point, in the middle of a battlefield facing unfathomable loss, she returned to traditions she had shunned, drawing strength from them in her own unique way, honoring the past while at the same time, vowing to change the future. The traditions gave her grounding and a sense of direction.

Almost twenty years ago, my father passed away just before Christmas. My mother died just a few short years later. They had both loved Christmas and always made a big deal of it and their presence was sorely missed those first holidays without them. As families grow, and blend, and change, new traditions are born, but our family still carries on many of the traditions my parents passed on to us, as their parents had to them, and every year those traditions give me moments of joy, bittersweet pause, and also comfort. I reflect on them as I stir a bowl of fudge, balance on a ladder hanging lights, or address a holiday card, thinking of Christmases past, when times were different, for both better and worse.

One particular holiday tradition that seemed to be uniquely my mother’s was making a holiday treat that wasn’t traditional at all. It wasn’t fudge, or a decorated sugar cookie, or a spiced mulled wine. It was something she called Corn Flake Chews. Yep, nothing fancy about it. But the stranger thing is, it’s made with peanut butter, and yes, corn flakes, neither of which I like, but it is one holiday treat that somehow works a strange Christmas magic to make me love and devour them. It mystifies even me.

Every year as I make up a batch I think of my mother and how small sweet miracles can happen, and that reminds me larger miracles can happen too, and I lick the spoon and reflect, and regroup, and am filled with gratitude for small humble treats, and tradition.

And so with that thought, I’d like share, from my household to yours, this simple but grand holiday sweetness that I promise will be devoured by one and all.

 

Christmas Corn Flake Chews

1 Cup sugar
1 Cup light corn syrup

1 Cup chunk peanut butter
6 Cups Corn Flakes
1/2 Cup chopped Red and Green M&M’s

(or double this whole recipe like I do—it is that yummy)

Bring the first two ingredients just to boil (do not overcook!) Remove from heat and blend in the peanut butter, stirring until smooth. Pour mixture over corn flakes and stir until flakes are well-coated. Sprinkle in chopped M&Ms (reserve 2T for later)

Pour and spread evenly into greased pan. Sprinkle top with reserved M&Ms. Use a sheet of wax paper to lightly press warm mixture down so it is even in pan. Cool, cut into 1or 2 inch squares, and enjoy!

I wish you all a happy holiday filled with traditions old and new, miracles both large and small, and quiet moments of reflection that will strengthen you for the coming year.

And always the refrain, Peace on earth, goodwill toward men.

xo,
Mary


About Mary E. Pearson

Mary E. Pearson is the award-winning author of The Jenna Fox Chronicles, The Miles Between, A Room on Lorelei, and Scribbler of Dreams.  She writes full-time from her home office in California where she lives with her husband and two golden retrievers.

Website | Twitter | Blog | Facebook | Pinterest

 

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Five Amazing Gift Ideas for Writers | Book Blogger Guest Post (+ Giveaway)

December 14, 2016 Bookish Finds, Giveaway, Guest Post 12

I am beyond excited to have Bonnie from A Backwards Story on the blog today to present her ideas for writer gifts. It’s easy to buy bookworms presents: Barnes & Noble or Amazon gift cards, pretty copies of books they love, accessories with books on them, items with book/reading quotes on them… etc. But what do you get a writer? Enter Bonnie! She has some wonderful ideas for you, and I’m so excited to share them with you.


Gift Ideas for Writers
By Bonnie at A Backwards Story

Are you looking for the perfect gift for a writer in your life?

As a fellow writer, I know we aren’t an easy bunch to shop for! We ask for strange things like our favorite brand of pen or correction pencil (or for us old-fashioned hand-writers in the bunch, even fun journals/notebooks!), and our friends and family stare at us like we’re crazy because, really, who wants pencils for Christmas?

THIS GIRL, for one!

But there are a lot of other cool gift ideas that are fun, affordable, and surprising!

Here are five gift ideas for writers–and as an extra special bonus, there’s a discount code for one of the gifts from Storiarts AND a chance to win another gift from Evie Seo!

Keep reading to hear more!!!

 

1. Idea Books

I found the two of these last year and thought they were the coolest, especially the BRIGHT IDEAS one because it’s COLOR CODED. Think of it like an already-prepped Bullet Journal, but easier to get to if you don’t color in tabs for yourself because you can just flip to the color for the the section you want. There are sections for hot ideas, wisps of dreamy memories, and more!

And the other one is just fun because, really, ideas can be evil, too. I mean, some authors ENJOY killing their darlings, right!? Well, okay, and it just helps you organize your ideas that you jot down on the train as you commute to work. Was it a good idea? A bad one? Not sure yet? There’s a spot to comment at the bottom!!)

(BRIGHT IDEAS: ISBN 978-1-4521-3914-2)
(EVIL SCHEMES: ISBN 8-25703-12160-5)

 

2. Writing Gloves

I don’t know about anyone else, but my hands get COLD when I’m writing in the winter. And cramp up. Since I write by hand, that’s not good at all! Thankfully, if I’m on my computer, I get a little bit of computer heat if I’m plugged in. But what about when I’m not?

I’m obsessed with these gloves by Storiarts and really want to pick up a pair for myself. (I’m torn between the Alice in Wonderland pair and the Peter Pan pair and just can’t make up my mind! I meant to ask for them for Christmas this year, but forgot…oops!!)

I have a lot of fingerless gloves, but the knit ones so easily found at stores can be scratchy, and they usually don’t have the thumb cut out.

What attracts me to the Storiarts Gloves is the way they’re more cottonish and will feel like a regular article of clothing. PLUS the thumbs are cut out. AND they have bookish references! #winwin

Ready to see these gloves in action?

From text to cool designs such as white rabbits and pixies, there’s always something to stare at while you’re wearing these gloves!

The gloves retail at $26, BUT Storiarts is so fantastic, that they’re giving out a special discount for our readers!!!

If you want these gloves–for yourself or a friend–
add discount code

ThatArtsyReaderGirl

(it’s not case sensitive!) to get 10% off your purchase!

This code is valid once per customer through the month of December!

If you order by December 19th, you’re guaranteed to have US Delivery in time for Christmas/Chanukah!

 

3. Story Cubes

Turn writing into a game! Especially when Writer’s Block is running rampant.

I saw Rory’s Story Cubes at the store recently, and thought they were adorable! Not to mention fun. And there are different packs, so whether you’re writing a novel about traveling to a foreign country or having a daring adventure, there’s something for every writer.

The pair I own, however, is wooden, and just has an old-fashioned, quaint, whimsical feel that I love as a fantasy writer, the Magic and Fairy-Tale Dice. You can special order it locally from stores such as Barnes and Noble, or buy it online from places such as Amazon (Though if you can support a local business and keep them around, that’s always personally my first go-to! The ISBN is 978-1856699198). My copy came from a Japanese bookstore in New York City called Kinokuniya.

What’s cool about this game is the fact that it’s not JUST a game. It can also be used as a tool for writers. Having writer’s block or looking for a cool element to include in the WIP you’re outlining? Throw some dice, invent a few words, and see where you wind up!

Additionally, this is a fun game to play with your friends, or even with kids, and it will never be the same story twice.

The game’s tagline is:

Revive the art of storytelling using these nine beautifully illustrated wooden dice to create the most imaginative, funny, and bizarre stories. This is the perfect family game that will stimulate the imaginations of children and adults alike. Ideal for playing by a log fire.

Here’s an old video review I did featuring the Magic and Fairy-Tale Dice:

These dice double as a game that can be played with friends and family members. Plus, they’re small and portable, and great to bring along on long car rides!

 

4. Writers actually DO like pens and notebooks!
There is no such thing as “too many!”

I’ve always LOVED getting notebooks and pens as gifts. I often see Kooky pens at A.C. Moore’s and Hallmark, and sometimes buy them even now. Pens with cute designs or pencils with interesting erasers are unique and fun, too. I always save the most interesting writing instruments for special occasions. When I was younger, I collected sets of Lisa Frank pens and wrote with them most frequently. (Does Lisa Frank even still exist? IDK!)

Fun notebooks with cute designs are inspirational, too. I’d rather pick up something with a design over a plain cover notebook any day, especially if it’s reminiscent of the project I’m working on.

Now, I know a lot of writers type and don’t write by hand, but it doesn’t mean they don’t still need to jot down ideas from time to time! Especially small, compact notebooks that fit into a purse. Or what if they’re at work and don’t want to whip out their computer at lunch? My one co-worker (Who just won NaNoWriMo 2016!!!) writes in her notebook every day at lunch. To her, every free minute is a writing minute!

 

5. Pen and Pencil Holders

Where are you going to put all those cute, fancy pens? Whether you’re a writer or a student, you’re going to want a cute case, right?

Until recently, I had no clue of where to go to find a cute case. I always looked during Back to School, but everything was plain or too kiddie.

Luckily, I was gifted a pouch by a publisher, and another by my awesome #OTSPSecretSister:

(I have no clue where my Sister got that case, but see all those zippers? It has THREE compartments to hold stuff. It’s amazing and my favorite thing ever!!!)

But not every writer can have a great pouch just fall into their laps.

That’s where great online shops such as Etsy and RedBubble come into play! My favorite shop belongs to Evie Seo, whose mugs, tote bags, and other book-themed offerings have made social media waves. If you’ve ever been to a big bookish event such as YALL or BookCon, you’ve probably seen at least one person sporting Evie’s designs!

Evie’s Studio Pouches make the PERFECT writing utensil bags for writers! (They also make great cosmetic bags!)

They come in Medium and Large sizes. The medium is a perfectly sized pencil pouch, while the larger one can also be a book sleeve in addition to all the utensils it can fit inside!

Here are some great examples of these stylish bags at work:

Can you see why Evie’s designs are my favorites!?

I love that she can be very fairy tale-ish and full of whimsy, or super bookish with quotes from favorite novels! There’s definitely something for everyone in her shop!

How about a GIVEAWAY!?

To make this holiday season even better for the writer in your life (or yourself, if you’re a writer!!), Evie Seo has graciously offered up a Studio Pouch with a design of choice to one lucky writer!!!!

Happy Holidays, Bookworms!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Under the Mistletoe by Jill Shalvis | Book Review

December 13, 2016 Adult Fiction, Book Review 0 ★★★★½

Under the Mistletoe by Jill Shalvis | Book ReviewUnder the Mistletoe by Jill Shalvis
Series: Lucky Harbor #6.5
Published by Forever Yours on December 4, 2012
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Holiday, Romance
Pages: 80
Format: eARC
Source: Bought from Amazon
Amazon Add to Goodreads
4.5 Stars
JUST ONE MORE KISS

There's no place like home for the holidays. And the Lucky Harbor Bed & Breakfast is bursting with festive lights and good cheer. But for Mia, Christmas is turning out to be anything other than merry and bright. Her recent break-up with her boyfriend Nick has made her return bittersweet. But then a surprise arrives, when Nick follows her to town bearing gifts-and asking for forgiveness.

Nick grew up without a family of his own so he's overwhelmed by the love that Mia receives from all her relatives, gathered together to celebrate the season. Under their watchful eyes, Nick finds earning back her trust the hardest thing he's ever had to do. If he succeeds, he will receive the greatest gift of all, Mia's love for a lifetime.

Can you believe this is my first Jill Shalvis book? I own SO many of her titles, but this is the first one I’ve read and I really loved it! It’s short and romantic… just what I need during this time of year when I want quick doses of Christmas cheer.

While this book can stand on its own, it takes place after the 6th book in the Lucky Harbor series. As much as I enjoyed it I’m pretty sure I would have loved it even more if I had read the first 6 books in the series already. I wasn’t confused or anything, and everything made sense… but it’s kind of like coming in to the school year mid-way through after all the friendships and routines have been set. I felt like I should have known these people better. The good thing, though, is that I love Lucky Harbor and I’m even more eager to begin the series! This was a great way for me to see if I like Jill’s writing, characters, setting, and swoons… and I do!

I really liked Mia and Nick together… even though I didn’t like Nick in the beginning. When he turns up in Lucky Harbor to win her back, though, I couldn’t help but smile and watch him try. There were some funny moments, deep moments, and downright romantic moments all wrapped up with a festive bow on top. I won’t say anything more because this book is a tiny little thing and I don’t want to ruin it. If you’re looking for a sweet christmas story, a continuance of the Lucky Harbor series, or even an easy book to commit to in order to decide if Jill Shalvis is an author for you (like I did), this is a really great book to pick up! And even though it’s a really short story, it felt complete and fully developed to me. A very enjoyable read!

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Christmas In What You Always Wanted by Kristin Rae | Bonus Scene (+ Giveaway)

December 12, 2016 Giveaway, Guest Post 1

I am SOOOO excited to have Kristin Rae here on the blog today! Guys, I love Kristin. Her debut, Wish You Were Italian, is one of my favorite books ever and her sophomore novel, What You Always Wanted is super adorable too!

Today Kristin is presenting this exclusive Christmas bonus scene of What You Always Wanted, and it’s pretty perfect. It’s pretty much as perfect as the Wish You Were Italian bonus scene she wrote for my blog last year. Can you tell I can’t get enough of her novels? I always want more! Thank you so much, Kristin, for writing this sweet scene for my blog!


What You Always Wanted Bonus Scene
by Kristin Rae


“So … what first?” I ask, sinking into the couch with my legs folded under me.
After closing the last blackout curtain so there’s no glare on the screen from the setting sun, Jesse plops down next to me and takes my hand in his. “How about this?”

I rub the soft, squishy skin between his thumb and pointer finger, leaning toward him until our shoulders touch but stopping short of resting my head against him. Yeah, I know we danced most of the day at the playhouse—by “dancing,” I mean “kissing”—but being able to snuggle against him on a couch in the dark when I was only dreaming about the possibility twenty-four hours ago … it’s not totally computing.

“This is nice,” I say, and he makes a noise of agreement as he settles deeper into the back cushion. “But I guess I mostly meant which movie do you want to watch?” With one hand, I pull my bag from the floor and dump the movie selection across our laps.

“It’s a Wonderful Life? The Bishop’s Wife? Are these Christmas movies?” he asks with an implied groan, which I ignore.

“Yes! Just a few of my favorites.” I let go of his hand and sort the DVDs. “I was thinking we could start with White Christmas because there’s dancing, and one of the characters does this crazy thing where she taps her toe at light speed, and I want you to show me if that’s even physically possible, then we could balance out the dancing after that with The Shop Around the Corner—”

“Hold on.” He stops me with a finger to my lips, and a little chill travels down to my toes. “Why did you ask what I wanted to watch if you had everything planned out through—” He counts the movies. “—tomorrow morning?”

I laugh, tugging a throw blanket over my legs to warm my nerves. “Well, I wasn’t expecting to watch all of them in one go.”

“Maddie. Christmas is over. It’s New Year’s Day. Radio stations have stopped playing holiday music. We’ve all moved on.” He looks me in the eye with a straight face. “You can too.”

My mouth drops open in exaggerated surprise, but it turns into a smile when he laughs. “The season needs to last loooongerrrr,” I say. “It has the best movies, the best music, best weather. And besides, we didn’t really get to experience it, like … I mean …”

“Like boyfriend and girlfriend, you mean?” He’s not laughing anymore, but a corner of his mouth stays up in a sly-looking half-smile.

I mirror him. “Maybe.”

“Best weather?” he asks, like he just registered everything else I said. “How ya figure?”

“Cold, sometimes rainy or windy, chance of snow. It just feels … Christmassy, you know?”

“If by chance of snow, you mean point zero zero zero zero two percent chance, then I totally know what you’re talking about.” He pulls the blanket so it covers his legs too and acts like he’s nestling against me for warmth. “So Christmassy.”

I go ahead and lean my head on his as we continue to hold hands under the blanket. Because I can. I smile to myself and listen to us breathe, memorize the feel of his hand in mine.

“All I’m asking is for one more day, Jesse,” I plead as playfully as possible so it doesn’t sound like begging. “One day with you where it still feels like there’s some Christmas magic leftover.”

“Okay. As your boyfriend, I will do this for you. The holiday season has been extended one more day.”

I sit up to study his face. He just called himself my boyfriend. And it didn’t freak him out. And it didn’t freak me out.

“You sure? Because as your girlfriend, I don’t want you to be completely miserable with the first movie we watch together as an official couple.”

“I can’t promise I won’t fall asleep at some point, but I can promise I’ll be the opposite of miserable as long as I can do this.” He tightens his grip on our interlaced fingers, indicating he’s content just to be here with me, holding hands. “Hang on. I’ll be right back.”

He disappears into the hall, and I hear him clomp down the stairs, then back up a minute later. “Close your eyes,” he calls from outside the room. “Okay?”

“They’re closed.”

“Keep ‘em shut.” He makes some racket up near the TV, and for a second I think he might be switching movie choices on me. Like I’d let him get away with that.

It gets brighter on the other side of my eyelids, and I scrunch my eyebrows together. Not because it’s that bright, but because I’m so confused by what he could be doing.

“Okay. Open.”

He stands proudly in front of the TV, which he’s draped with a string of colored Christmas lights. They’re covering part of the screen, but I don’t care. He’s so adorably sweet, I almost can’t stand it.

I hop up off the couch, and before wrapping my arms around him, I lean in and give the tiny round scar on his cheek a quick kiss. Merry Christmas to me.

Have you read What You Always Wanted?
You really should because how cute are Maddie and Jesse?

What You Always Wanted by Kristin Rae
Series: If Only… #8
Published by Bloomsbury Children’s on March 29, 2016
Genres: Contemporary Romance
Add to Goodreads | Amazon

If only…he was the boy she’s been dreaming of.

Theatre girl Maddie Brooks has always had high standards for guys. But she has yet to find one who can live up to the classic Hollywood heartthrobs, especially the dreamy song-and-dance man Gene Kelly. When Maddie begins to carpool with Jesse Morales, her new neighbor and star pitcher of the baseball team, she’s struck by his wit, good looks, and love for his family—but a guy so into sports is definitely not her style. Then Maddie discovers that Jesse was raised as a dancer and still practices in the community theatre’s dance studio to keep in shape. Perhaps her perfect dream guy exists after all! But when it becomes clear that baseball—not dance—is Jesse’s passion, can Maddie find a way to let her dream guy go and appreciate the charms of the amazing guy in front of her?

This fun, high school theatre romance in the If Only line is for anyone who has ever wished for that impossibly perfect guy.


About Kristin Rae

Lover of books, music, chocolate, and crafty things. My young adult contemporary novels WISH YOU WERE ITALIAN, and WHAT YOU ALWAYS WANTED are out now, from Bloomsbury. Represented by Marietta Zacker of the Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency.

Website | Twitter

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest

Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare | Book Review

December 11, 2016 Adult Fiction, Book Review 1 ★★★★

Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare | Book ReviewOnce Upon a Winter's Eve by Tessa Dare
Series: Spindle Cover #1.5
Genres: Historical Romance, Holiday, Romance
Pages: 113
Format: eBook
Source: Bought from Amazon
Amazon Add to Goodreads
4 Stars
Some wallflowers bloom at night…

Violet is a quiet girl. She speaks six languages, but seldom raises her voice. The gentlemen aren’t beating down her door.

Until the night of the Spindle Cove Christmas ball, when a mysterious stranger crashes into the ballroom and collapses at Violet’s feet. He’s wet, chilled, bleeding, and speaking in an unfamiliar tongue.

Only Violet understands him. And she knows he’s not what he seems.

She has one night to draw forth the secrets of this dangerously handsome rogue. Is he a smuggler? A fugitive? An enemy spy? She needs answers by sunrise, but her captive would rather seduce than confess. To learn his secrets, Violet must reveal hers—and open herself to adventure, passion, and the unthinkable… Love.

A Christmas ball crasher! Guys, I love Tessa Dare’s stories. They are always so unique and swoony, and this one doesn’t disappoint at all. I’ve always been the quiet, bookish wallflower type, which is why I loved Violet Winterbottom in A Night to Surrender (review coming in January). Now I love her even more! She’s smart and sassy and sweet. She’s also assertive and strong. She’s been through a LOT. I loved the mysterious injured man, and who he became to Violet. Boy, was his entrance memorable the way he stumbled into the ball injured and delirious and fell on her lap. The mystery and conspiracy surrounding him were super intriguing, and I really enjoyed getting to know him. He doesn’t speak English, so Violet’s language expertise brings them together as she tries to figure out who he is. I don’t want to spoil anything, so I’ll just say… he’s not who he first appears to be.

I think I liked this story more than the one in A Night to Surrender! I wish it were longer because I really connected with these characters and the story. I hope to see more of them in the next Spindle Cove novel so I can see what they’re up to. Definitely read this book if you plan to stick with Spindle Cove or if you’re looking for a quick romance (it can stand on its own but there’s a cameo of the characters we met in the first book so that’s fun!). Sometimes novellas feel rushed or incomplete, but this one didn’t! I loved it!

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Email Pinterest